IARC Warns that Processed Red Meat Leads to Colorectal Cancer

Filed in Nursing News by on November 4, 2015 0 Comments

The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), announced that the consumption of processed and red meat is associated with an increased risk for colorectal cancer.

Professor Vikash Sewram, the Director of the African Cancer Institute at Stellenbosch University’s Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, who also chairs the South African Ministerial Advisory Committee on the Prevention and Control of Cancer, answers some tough questions about this important announcement.

The assessment was part of the IARC’s Monographs Programme that has been involved since 1971 in evaluation of carcinogenic risks to humans – whether it be exposure to chemicals, complex mixtures, biological agents, occupational exposures or lifestyle factors.

The evaluation of a risk factor takes place over a period of time and entails interdisciplinary working groups of expert scientists, selected from all over the world, reviewing published studies and evaluating the weight of the evidence that an agent can increase the risk of cancer.

Once the evidence has been evaluated and a consensus reached, the agent is classified into one of five categories: Group 1: carcinogenic to humans; Group 2A: probably carcinogenic; Group 2B: possibly carcinogenic; Group 3: not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity; and Group 4: probably not carcinogenic to humans.

What Does The Evidence Show?

The IARC evaluated two types of meat: processed meat (e.g. meat that has been transformed through salting, curing, fermentation, smoking or adding of preservatives) and red meat (beef, lamb, pork, veal, mutton, horse and goat).

A working group of 22 experts from 10 countries evaluated the evidence from 800 studies and found that processed meat is carcinogenic to humans (Group 1), as there is sufficient evidence from epidemiological and mechanistic studies from around the world that show processed meat consumption causes colorectal cancer.

Red meat consumption was classified as probably carcinogenic to humans (Group 2A) based on limited epidemiological evidence in humans, although there was strong evidence to support mechanistic events leading to cancer.

A statistically significant dose–response relationship was found where for each 50 gram portion of processed meat eaten per day, the risk of developing cancer increased by 18%. However the risk following a 100 gram portion intake of red meat per day increased by 17%.

Why Is There A Link Between Meat Intake And Cancer?

The risk of developing cancer arises from chemicals that are produced by processing the meats and from cooking. For example, cooking at high temperatures or placing meat in direct contact with a flame can produce certain types of chemicals that can damage the DNA.

These chemicals are known as carcinogens. A few possible explanations for the link with processed foods are as follows:

Preservatives contain chemicals, known as nitrates, that are added to some processed meats and have been shown in some studies to produce N-nitrosamines during cooking – molecules that cause cancer.

The smoking process leads to the meat being contaminated with carcinogenic chemicals from the smoke itself, known as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

When meat is cooked at high heat, PAHs and other carcinogenic chemicals known as heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAA), are formed and these chemicals damage DNA. Pan-frying, grilling or barbecuing produces the highest amounts of these chemicals.

Should I Stop Eating Meat?

The decision to stop eating meat is a personal choice.

Meat is a good source for protein, contains all the essential amino acids, is rich in iron, zinc, and selenium and contains vitamins A, B and D. Conversely, processed and red meat is relatively high in saturated fat and cholesterol, which are linked to increased risk of heart disease.

Consumers are advised to moderate their meat intake. Regularly eating large portions of red and processed meat over a long period of time is not advisable.

A balanced diet combined with fruits, vegetables and fibre and regular exercising is the goal for a healthy life.

The top priorities for the prevention of cancer and other non-communicable diseases remain smoking cessation, reduction of alcohol intake, maintenance of normal body weight and balanced nutrition.

Reducing meat intake is just one way of minimising risk. While primary prevention continues to be advocated, early detection remains the mainstay for successful treatment and outcomes.

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